Our Blog RSS

70,000 Deaths A Year Are Caused by Sitting

Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast and Ulster University in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health claimed their figures were conservative when they put a figure of £700,000 a year cost to the NHS attributed to the impacts of a sedentary lifestyle. The new research explains 70,000 deaths a year are linked to negative impacts of sedentary behaviour. In short; sitting is killing you.

The researchers recommended measures be taken to reduce inactivity in order to reduce the strain on the NHS resources and improve population health.

Sitting for long periods does contribute to the likelihood that you will become obese (which itself reportedly costs the NHS 6 Billion and causes 30K deaths every year ) but importantly they report the act of sitting has an impact on the body at a physiological level.

When we sit for long periods our body's response to insulin becomes less effective. Insulin mops up excess sugar in the blood and failure of this to work leads to risk of type 2 diabetes.

Sitting increases our risk of heart disease as the ratio of of good cholesterol to bad cholesterol tips towards the negative with extensive sitting.

A study published last year showed a shocking 70% increase in risk of colorectal cancer for people who sit for two hours a day watching TV.

Dr Mike Brannan, national lead for physical activity at Public Health England says: ‘Even if you are physically active, sitting for long periods of time damages your health and greatly increases your risks of a broad range of health conditions.’

The reality is that if sitting were a product it would come with dire health warnings and be subject to punitive fines. The negative impact is far reaching and can't be countered by bouts of exercise alone. Instead regular breaks from sitting are essential and getting in the the habit of movement can be helped by embracing the standing desk culture.

NHS stats on obesity and inactivity


In fact schools have started trialling standing desks and have found an increase in productivity and increased engagement. An 8 school trial at primary level found ‘Teachers reported the standing desks improved the children’s concentration and improved behaviour,’ says Dr Clemes. ‘But the biggest promising effect was the improvement it had on reading scores.’

‘We know from studies that children who sit a lot are likely to become adults who sit a lot and our thinking is if we can get in early and change their mindset these children will be less likely to be so sedentary’

If your school wants to trial standing desks for kids you can visit our trial page and sign up in just 60 seconds.

You may also want to read: Sitting Is Deadly For Students & Guidance from the NHS: Health matters: obesity and the food environment

Nick White March 27, 2019 3 tags (show)

Leave a comment

Please note: comments must be approved before they are published.

top Liquid error: Could not find asset snippets/zopim.liquid